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SNAP – The House of Representatives voted to drastically cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

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The House of Representatives voted to drastically cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

Statement of Howard Bedlin, NCOA Vice President for Public Policy & Advocacy

Washington, DC – The National Council on Aging (NCOA) is deeply disappointed that the House of Representatives voted 217-210 yesterday to drastically cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

The House bill cuts SNAP funding by $40 billion, causing significant harm to vulnerable seniors and other Americans who are food insecure. Nearly 3 million households with seniors—6.5 million people—lack access to enough food for a healthy life.

Nearly 4 million people aged 60+ are enrolled in SNAP. Yet, the typical senior household enrolled in the program has an annual income under $10,000 and only receives about $4 per day in benefits. This modest benefit helps seniors who too often are forced to choose between paying for food, medicine, rent, or other daily costs.

Included in the cuts are reductions to federal funding used to reach millions of seniors who are eligible for, but not receiving, this critical benefit. Only about one-third of eligible seniors actually receive SNAP. State and local agencies rely on federal outreach funds to help these vulnerable seniors enroll.

The bill also eliminates provisions that streamline access to SNAP, making it more difficult for individuals with modest assets but limited fixed incomes to receive the benefit. This change will drop 1.8 million low-income Americans—many of them seniors—off the program.

NCOA strives for an America where no senior goes to bed hungry. The House bill severely undermines this effort. NCOA urges the Senate to vote against it and applauds the President’s intent to veto it.

This is sad to see them push this through for a farm bill what is the us coming to?

September 21, 2013 |

Albuquerque New Mexico P.E.T.S. Program – Senior who is homebound can get help

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What is the P.E.T.S. Program?

Pets & the Elderly Together S

This project is a partnership between the City of Albuquerque Department of Senior Affairs, the Environmental Health Department and the Animal Humane Association of New Mexico. Homebound seniors age 60 and older who receive Home Delivered Meals from the Department of Senior Affairs will be the recipients of dog and cat food for their pets.

The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program of the Department of Senior Affairs is recruiting volunteers. To participate in this project call the Senior Information Line at (505) 764-6400.

How should donations or contributions for home delivered meals be made?

Donations should be made by check or money order payable to the City of Albuquerque, Nutrition Program.

Envelopes with the postage pre-paid are provided to clients.

Additional envelopes can be obtained by calling Sandra at 848-1399.

Money is not to be given directly to the driver or any other person representing the Nutrition Program.

What resources are available for a senior who is homebound and frail?

The department of Senior Affairs provides access to many services in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County for frail homebound seniors over the age of 60.

Services include Care Coordination, Home Retrofit (installation of wheelchair ramps, grab bars, safety rails and other supportive equipment), basic Home Repair and Home Chores, Home-Delivered Meals, and Senior Transportation.

Interested public should call(505) 764-6400 between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday to speak to an intake specialist.

The Senior Information number(505) 764-6400 is the Department of Senior Affairs one-stop telephone number that provides information, assessment, referral, assistance, and literature.

September 12, 2013 |

ADA Requirements For Grab Bar Height In Bathtubs

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Figure 34. Grab Bars at Bathtubs.

Controls are required to be located in an area between the open edge and the midpoint of the tub (“offset”) and to be located at the foot of the tub.

Figure 34(a) With Seat in Tub. At the foot of the tub, the grab bar shall be 24 inches (610 mm) minimum in length measured from the outer edge of the tub. On the back wall, two grab bars are required. The grab bars mounted on the back (long) wall shall be a minimum 24 inches (610 mm) in length located 12 inches (305 mm) maximum from the foot of the tub and 24 inches (610 mm) maximum from the head of the tub. One grab bar on the back wall shall be located 9 inches (230 mm) above the rim of the tub. The other shall be 33 to 36 inches (840 mm to 915 mm) above the bathroom floor. At the head of the tub, the grab bar shall be a minimum of 12 inches (305 mm) in length measured from the outer edge of the tub.

Figure 34(b) With Seat at Head of Tub. At the foot of the tub, the grab bar shall be a minimum of 24 inches (610 mm) in length measured from the outer edge of the tub. On the back wall, two grab bars are required. The grab bars mounted on the back wall shall be a minimum of 48 inches (1220 mm) in length located a maximum of 12 inches (305 mm) from the foot of the tub and a maximum of 15 inches (380 mm) from the head of the tub. Heights of grab bars are as described above. No horizontal grab bar should be placed at the head of the tub.

 

ADA Requirements For Grab Bar Height In Bathtubs

ADA Requirements For Grab Bar Height In Bathtubs

 

Fig. 34
Grab Bars at Bathtubs

 

Sourced from: http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html – http://ocgrabbars.com/

September 3, 2013 |

ADA Height Requirements For Grab Bars By Toilet

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ADA Height Requirements for toilet

Figure 29. Grab Bars By The Toilet.

Figure 29(a) Back Wall. A 36 inches (915 mm) minimum length grab bar, mounted 33-36 inches (840-915 mm) above the finish floor, is required behind the water closet. The grab bar must extend at least 12 inches (305 mm) from the centerline of the water closet toward the side wall and at least 24 inches (610 mm) from the centerline of the water closet toward the open side.

Figure 29(b) Side Wall. A 42 inches (1065 mm) minimum length grab bar is required on the side wall, spaced a maximum of 12 inches (305 mm) from the back wall and extending a minimum of 54 inches (1370 mm) from the back wall at a height of 33-36 inches (840-915 mm). The toilet paper dispenser shall be mounted below the grab bar at a minimum height of 19 inches (485 mm). The height of the toilet seat shall be 17 to 19 inches (430 – 485 mm) above the finished floor.

 

ADA Height Requirements for toilet

Fig. 29
Grab Bars at Water Closets

Figure A6. Wheelchair Transfers.

A6(a). Diagonal Approach. Shows a person using a wheelchair approaching a water closet or toilet (toilet) from the front and turning to the left to position the wheelchair at a diagonal to the water closet or toilet. The centerline toilet is shown as 18 inches (455 mm) from the closest side wall. The edge of the clear floor space on the opposite side of the toilet is shown as 18 – 30 inches (455 – 760 mm) from the edge of the clear floor space to the centerline of the toilet. Four illustrations show the transfer from the wheelchair to the seat of the toilet. In (1), the user takes a transfer position, swings footrest out of the way, and sets brakes. In (2), the user removes the armrest closest to the toilet, and transfers by pivoting counterclockwise and moving from the wheelchair seat towards the toilet seat. In (3), the user moves the wheelchair out of the way and changes position (some people fold chair or pivot it 90 degrees to the toilet). In (4), the user positions on toilet, and releases brake.

 
A6(b). Side Approach. Shows a person using a wheelchair positioned to one side of a toilet. The back of the wheelchair is facing the wall that is behind the toilet. In the figure, the toilet is to the left of the wheelchair user. The centerline toilet is shown as 18 inches (455 mm) from the closest side wall. The edge of the clear floor space on the opposite side of the toilet is shown as 42 inches (1065 mm) from the edge of the clear floor space to the centerline of the toilet. Three illustrations show the transfer from the wheelchair to the toilet. In (1), the user takes the transfer position adjacent to the toilet, removes the armrest closest to the toilet and sets brakes. In (2), the user transfers from the wheelchair to the seat of the toilet by sliding sideways from the wheelchair seat onto the toilet seat. In (3), the user positions on the toilet seat. The wheelchair remains positioned beside the toilet.

 

Wheelchair Transfers

Wheelchair Transfers

Fig. A6
Wheelchair Transfers

 

Sourced from: http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html – http://ocgrabbars.com/

September 3, 2013 |

ADA Grab Bars In Shower Stall

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ADA Grab Bar high in Shower Stalls

Figure 37. Grab Bars at Shower Stalls.

Figure 37(a) 36 in by 36 inches (915 mm by 915 mm) Transfer Stall. The L-shaped shower seat shall be 18 inches (455 mm) above the floor measured at the entry. An L-shaped grab bar (or two single grab bars with the ends close together) shall be provided, located along the full depth of the control wall (opposite the seat) and halfway (18 inches (455 mm)) along the back wall. The grab bar(s) shall be mounted 33-36 inches (840-915 mm) above the shower floor measured at the entry.

The controls shall be placed in an area between 38-48 inches (965-1220 mm) above the floor. The controls and spray unit shall be within 18 inches (455 mm) of the front of the shower.

Figure 37(b) 30 in by 60 inches (760 mm by 1525 mm) Roll-in Stall. A U-shaped grab bar (or three separate grab bars) shall be provided. The grab bar (or bars) shall be 33-36 inches (840-915 mm) high. The controls shall be placed in an area between 38-48 inches (965 -1220 mm) above the floor. Controls shall be located on the back (long) wall 27 inches (685 mm) from the side wall. The shower head and control area may be located on the back wall or on either side wall.

 

ADA Grab Bar high in Shower Stalls

ADA Grab Bar high in Shower Stalls

Fig. 37
Grab Bars at Shower Stalls

Sourced from: http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html – http://ocgrabbars.com/

September 2, 2013 |

North Dakota’s IPAT Distributes Age-In-Place Assistive Technology

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North Dakota’s IPAT Distributes Age-In-Place Assistive Technology (AT)

In North Dakota, IPAT partners with Aging Services (Older American Act $$) to provide up to $300 worth of AT per person to applicants 60+ years and living at home.

The Assistive Safety Device Distribution Service (ASDDS) provided 2,838 pieces of equipment to 1,735 North Dakotans between July, 2008 through June, 2009.

IPAT Executive Director Judie Lee says the ASDDS goes a long way toward marketing IPAT services in general thanks to its word-of-mouth popularity. Devices provided include grab bars, magnifiers, reachers, medication dispensers, and seat-lifts. Items are drop-shipped to homes and equipment installation is also provided.

IPAT uses an initial consultation and questionnaire to screen for needs. It requires a licensed contractor or an immediate family member to install grab bars. And it receives a continuous stream of thank you notes from happy seniors and families.

Learn more at the North Dakota IPAT website.

August 26, 2013 |

How can older adults prevent falls?

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How can older adults prevent falls?

Older adults can remain independent and reduce their chances of falling. They can:

Exercise regularly. It is important that the exercises focus on increasing leg strength and improving balance, and that they get more challenging over time. Tai Chi programs are especially good.
Ask their doctor or pharmacist to review their medicines-both prescription and over-the counter-to identify medicines that may cause side effects or interactions such as dizziness or drowsiness.
Have their eyes checked by an eye doctor at least once a year and update their eyeglasses to maximize their vision. Consider getting a pair with single vision distance lenses for some activities such as walking outside.
Make their homes safer by reducing tripping hazards, adding grab bars inside and outside the tub or shower and next to the toilet, adding railings on both sides of stairways and improving the lighting in their homes.
To lower their hip fracture risk, older adults can:

Get adequate calcium and vitamin D-from food and/or from supplements.
Do weight bearing exercise.
Get screened and, if needed, treated for osteoporosis.

August 26, 2013 |

Preventing Bathroom Falls and Injuries

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Grab bars are an essential enhancement that truly is necessary to Preventing Bathroom Falls in the home of anyone over the age of 70. Don’t let pride get in the way; you want to avoid injury, and statistically, if you’re going to take a spill, it’s likely to be in the bathroom. This is why you need a modern, up to date grab bar installation, which can help you avoid slipping and Preventing Bathroom Falls, should you ever lose your balance or need support.

If you have ever undergone joint surgery or had problems with those parts of your body, you are doubly at risk. Believe it or not, falls account for nearly two thirds of the injuries people over 55 sustain; if you look at people aged 70+ this increases to over 80%. One of the biggest problems is that even if your joints do work correctly, you can still lose your balance because of weakness elsewhere in your frame.

Here are three big reasons you should consider using bathroom safety bars:

• Your personal safety – No doubt about it, this is the prime concern. When you look at it statistically, protecting yourself in the bathroom is one of the most important things you can do to ensure your ongoing good health.

• Cost – Having a custom grab bar installation probably costs less than you may imagine. Dealing with OC Grab Bars means that you’re always going to be paying a fair price for excellent labor, parts, and installation.

• Customer service – If you have ever needed to deal with companies over the internet before, you understand that a good reputation online is worth its weight in gold. All of our work and products have a guarantee, and our customers are always satisfied.

August 11, 2013 |

Keeping Mom and Dad safe in their home

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As our parents age it is the children’s job to make sure that mom and dad are safe in their home as falls in the bathroom increase in people who are 65 and older. This is due to poor circulation, certain diseases such as diabetic neuropathy (numbness in the feet), high blood or low blood pressure not to mention osteoporosis which makes the bones more susceptible to breaking during a fall.

As children get older it is only natural for them to leave home and go about their own life which leaves mom and dad by themselves. When the children are busy with their own families and careers visiting mom and dad generally become less and less. Keep your parents safe while you are away and help prevent a bathroom accident by haing grab bars installed in their home.

Purchase an elevated toilet so elderly parents do not have to bend down so far.

Install grab bars next to the toilet to provide extra support while getting on and off of the toilet.

Install grab bars in the bathtub or shower enclosure so your parents have something to hold onto in the event they loose their balance.

Install a hand-held shower along with a bathtub bench or chair so your parents do not have to stand while taking a shower or try to stoop low to sit inside of the bathtub.

Reduce the hot water temperature to less than 120 degrees to prevent scalding on thin elderly skin.

Keep a nightlight in the bathroom on at all times. This will prevent your elderly parents from tripping over the bathroom rug in the middle of the night as the elderly tend to shuffle their feet.

Use rubber non-skid mats or decals in the bathtub or shower enclosure.

Place shelving in the tub or shower so shampoo and soap can be reached easily.

Install a toilet grab bar so your parents can have better stability while getting on and off of the toilet.

Install a bathtub rail for stability and something to grab onto while exiting and entering the tub area.

Our parents took care of us for many years, it is our time to take care of our parents and make sure they are safe just like they did for us. This is what family is all about. Your parents will definitely appreciate your help.

August 11, 2013 |
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